Warning: ksort() expects parameter 1 to be array, object given in /homepages/40/d496283145/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/bbpress/includes/core/template-functions.php on line 316
The Official PlayStation Museum | Video Game Graveyard - Page 3 of 3 - The Official PlayStation Museum
Login Register
 
Facebook Flickr YouTube

Video Game Graveyard

Video Game Graveyard

MELT
Publisher: ASC

The Basics
While searching to kill Eddie, the so-called “ultimate evil” and mascot of the band Iron Maiden, you would have traveled through 50 different worlds in an attempt to take his energy pods before he destroyed the universe. That’s about all we know of this single-player action game that never came to be, besides the fact that it was supposed to feature music by Iron Maiden.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Unknown

Mickey’s Wild Adventure
Publisher: Ascii

The Basics
Disney’s Mickey would have made his leap onto the console systems with this single-player action title for the PlayStation. Sony of Europe brought the title out overseas, but Sony of America never released it in the US. Mickey’s Wild Adventure would’ve been a side-scroller, typical of the previous Mickey games, featuring decent graphics and Disney-style animation.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Mickey’s Wild Adventure was quietly turned into Mickey’s Big Sleep.

Mindscape Golf
Publisher: Mindscape

The Basics
Unlike many Mindscape products, this idea wasn’t completely cliched or stupid–a golf game with completely made-up and invariably outrageous courses. But rather than stray into the Zone of Originality, Mindscape killed the project and continued to focus on cranking out bland space shooters.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Unknown

MVP Baseball
Publisher: Data East

The Basics
Data East bailed the PlayStation market in mid-’96, and they took this simulation of the Great American Pastime with them. Phooey.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Unknown

NCAA Football: Saturday Showdown
Publisher: Mindscape

The Basics
Considering the waking nightmare that was Mindscape’s NCAA Final Four, it’s undoubtedly a very good thing this game never appeared.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Unknown

NBA ShootOut 99
Publisher: 989 Studios

The Basics
While ShootOut 97 was met with acclaim, ShootOut 98 was a definite disappointment, something that 989 was hoping to avoid with ShootOut 99. The game was based on the same engine, with a few new features – like all-new 3D players and arena models, as well as a TV-style presentation. Ian Eagle, the New Jersey Nets broadcaster, was scheduled to do the play-by-play, and there were a number of new motion captures, including those from Bo Outlaw, Jason Kidd, Robert Horry, and Brevin Knight.

Features you might be familiar with that would have returned were the complete NBA license, so you would have gotten all 29 NBA teams, total control dunking (updated), icon cutting (updated), icon passing (updated), realistic player performances and sizes, full-season and game stats, and the standard modes – exhibition, tournament, All-Star, playoffs, and the finals.

nbashoot99 nbashoot9910 nbashoot9911 nbashoot9912

WHAT HAPPENED?
Sony originally delayed the release of NBA ShootOut until December 1998. Then, on February 2, 1999, 989’s ShootOut ’99 was canceled because of “quality issues,” and the development team moved toward development on ShootOut 2000, which was released late November 1999.

Omikron
Publisher: Eidos

The Basics
This PlayStation action-adventure game from Eidos was being pared down at one point, perhaps when the company realized it was too ambitious for the PlayStation environment. When we first spoke with Eidos, we were told that the game was going to have something of everything – an excellent fighting engine, amazing puzzle-solving capabilities through a revolutionary new system called IAM, and tremendous shooting action. Well, when we went to Eidos and saw the game firsthand, things had changed significantly – gone was the claim of a Tekken-style fighting engine and the word IAM was never mentioned. The developer had finally realized that it had taken too much on and decided simply to make an action-adventure with a few RPG elements, a few puzzle elements, and a solid hand-to-hand combat system.

omikron1 omikron2 omikron3 omikron4

Omikron was the name of the city you’d be roaming. You – playing actually as yourself – were to inhabit various bodies throughout the game. Each time one of them died, you’d hop into a new character (usually the first person who touched you, although you’d also have reincarnation spells to use). There would have been about 50 different characters available for inhabitation, but you wouldn’t need to inhabit all of them to finish the game. You’d move through four separate chapters as you tried to evade the demons that wanted to take your (and just about everyone else’s) soul.

omikron5 omikron6 omikron7 omikron8

The game had a ton of dialogue, and you’d interact with numerous NPCs – like Kay’l’s wife, for example (Kay’l being a cop and the first body you’d inhabit). The game had real-time facial motion capture, so the idea was that you’d feel more attached to – or least more interested in – many of the characters you came across because they’d seem more real. But Omikron was still going to be basically about action; the weapons inventory was large, but you would have had to fight some of the boss characters hand to hand. You’d have four essential combat moves – a high punch, a low punch, a high kick, and a low kick. Not exactly Tekken, but at one point the combat system looked relatively solid. You’d also do things like drive futuristic vehicles and solve puzzles.

WHAT HAPPENED?
There had originally been rumors floating around the Net saying that Omikron had been put on hold. Then Eidos made it official by announcing that instead of being put on hold, the project had been cancelled. One Eidos source said, “Yes, it’s true. It was mainly an issue of so much art and too much detail for the PlayStation to handle.”

Pinky & The Brain
Publisher: Konami

The Basics
Warner Bros.’ Animaniac characters Pinky & The Brain almost made their video game debut on the Sega Saturn and the Sony PlayStation, but it didn’t happen. Brain, of course, is the smarter of the mouse duo and uses his genius to devise plans for taking over the world. Pinky, on the other hand, isn’t all that interested in world domination; he just hangs out with his pal Brain and usually fouls up his partner’s plans. The Saturn version would have generally followed this storyline in the planned single player action game.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Quietly canceled.

Perfect Weapon 2
Publisher: ASC

The Basics
Perfect Weapon 2 was probably best described as the sequel to Perfect Weapon. The game was originally called Final Weapon, but never made it past the concept stages.

WHAT HAPPENED?
ASC didn’t really say why the game was canceled, but admitted, “Of all of our games, this is one that you could one day see on the market on some new system down the road. But for now, it’s just a document.”

Prince of Persia
Publisher: Avalanche Software

The Basics
Prince of Persia 3D was to be based on Red Orb Entertainment’s PC version of the game, which shipped in August of 1999. The redux of the game series, which started in 1989, would have used character models and animations from the most recent PC title.

prince1 prince2 prince3 prince4

Prince of Persia 3D features a storyline co-authored by Jordan Mechner, the creator of the original Prince of Persia. It revolves around you, the prince, attempting to save your true love, the princess, from the evil Assan.  Mindscape stated that the game would have been altered slightly for the PlayStation, by increasing the emphasis on action. “We recognize that the PC and PlayStation customers have different preferences,” said Mindscape. “We intend to provide the PlayStation enthusiast with an experience that appeals more directly to their tastes, resulting in a product that combines the fast-action combat with the depth and immersion of a classic action-adventure game.”

prince5 prince6 prince7 prince8

WHAT HAPPENED?
The PlayStation version of Prince of Persia 3D was canceled to allow developers to focus on appealing to Dreamcast enthusiasts with the coming DC version instead.

Propaganda
Publisher: Virgin Interactive

The Basics
Conceived at the peak of Virgin’s money-spending frenzy (such as the $10+ million they frittered away on the point-and-click adventure Toonstruck, a critical and commercial bomb), Propaganda was apparently a driving/shooting game in the Twisted Metal vein. Virgin was always secretive about the product, most probably to disguise the fact that the game design was seriously flawed or nonexistent.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Unknown

Quake
Publisher: GT

The Basics
C’mon. It’s Quake we’re talking about. First person shooter and all of that.

WHAT HAPPENED?
GT says Quake for the PlayStation was never officially announced and that its development was a rumor that leaked out somehow. Activision said at one point that GT was working on something Quake, and that id wasn’t happy with GT’s treatment of it. In any case, this version for the PlayStation never came out, regardless of the story.

Rattlesnake Red
Publisher: Acclaim

The Basics
Rattlesnake Red was slated to be a true 3D platform action-adventure game in which you would have controlled Red, the main character, through an array of environments such as canyons and mines, avoiding obstacles and defeating the enemies you’d bump into along the way.

There were eight levels, decorated in real-time lighting, and a bunch of moves and power-ups for the character. Besides battling with the enemies, Red was to solve puzzles (seemingly consisting of removing obstacles from his path).

WHAT HAPPENED?
Rattlesnake Red was one of the titles that was canceled when Acclaim trimmed back its game lineup.

Raze
Publisher: Interplay

The Basics
Interplay planned to break the conventions of fighting games in not one, but two, ways with its PlayStation title Raze. To begin with, Raze would have been a four-player fighting game, and yes, those characters would’ve shared the same screen. Second, it was purportedly a true 3D fighter, much like Square’s Bushido Blade, where characters could climb, run, and jump in a three-dimensional world. Unlike BB though, they would actually have to turn and attack their foes manually; there was no cheap default for them to fall back on.

The title was conceptually set in TSR’s Forgotten Realms role-playing and would have used such D&D standbys as magic, rings, artifacts, and the building of character attributes, which were savable to the PlayStation’s memory cards. The game’s storyline, however, was never set in stone.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Raze quietly disappeared from Interplay’s lineup. It is assumed that something went wrong with the approval process with TSR’s new owners, Wizards of the Coast.

Respect Inc.
Publisher: Psygnosis

The Basics
Respect Inc. was initially developed by a third-party developer. It was a nice concept (a Mafia strategy game where your success was measured by respect gained), though how well the ideas would have transferred into gameplay is debatable. The graphics were a little clunky, too.

WHAT HAPPENED?
According to Psygnosis, the game was put into review and consequently killed.

Rebel Moon Rising
Publisher: GT Interactive

The Basics
Rebel Moon Rising was to be a first-person futuristic shooter for the PC and PlayStation. However, the PlayStation version was canceled after the PC version failed to do very well, largely due to the fact that if you didn’t have MMX, you were out of luck. That’s right, the game actually required the high-end processor to work at all on the PC.

WHAT HAPPENED?
In June 1997, GT Interactive officials announced that it had officially canceled the PlayStation version of the first-person shooter Rebel Moon Rising. It’s likely the decision was reached because of the poor reception the PC version (which was MMX only) garnered.

Return Fire II
Publisher: MGM Interactive

The Basics
MGM Interactive’s long-time-coming 3D action-strategy title for the Sony PlayStation, Return Fire II (the sequel to Return Fire, which appeared on the 3DO, PlayStation, Saturn, and PC).

Basically capture-the-flag with high-end ammo, RFII was being developed under the tutelage of the original creator whose team had reportedly stepped up the graphics, multiplayer capabilities, combat interaction, enemy AI, perspective, and the level of strategy needed to beat the game. In single- or multiplayer mode, you would have battled from a behind-the-vehicle or behind-the-wheel perspective, creating, perhaps, a more immersive playing field experience.

screenshot1rf screenshot3rf

Pitted against intelligent opponents (who were notably more intelligent this time around), you would have been equipped with a stockpile of vehicles, such as helicopters, PT boats, and jump jets launched from an aircraft carrier, tanks, and four-wheel drives. These transports would handle differently in each environment, from city streets and jungles to deserts and the arctic. Active weather conditions and landscape features, such as mountain ranges and bodies of water, also influenced the controllability of vehicles and availability of access to enemy troops.

RFII also included more missions than the original, analog control, new vehicle designs, and enhanced gameplay, as jet fighters couldhave engaged in dogfights.

WHAT HAPPENED?
MGM Interactive pulled the plug on Return Fire II for the PlayStation, saying that the project would be a huge undertaking for the system. A spokesperson for the company said that the game would be released for the PC only.

Rocket Jockey
Developer: Rocket Science Games

The Basics
Rocket Jockey was a 3D driving, fighting, and sports game planned for the PlayStation and the PC that only made it to the PC. In descriptions that make it sound like a futuristic king-of-the-hill game like you played in third grade, the game was to include three modes of play: rocket war, rocket racing, and rocket ball.

act_rockjock_screen01 act_rockjock_screen02 act_rockjock_screen03 act_rockjock_screen04

Based on the PC release, in rocket war, you competed in ten levels of head-to-head combat with others, with the last person alive winning the match. In rocket racing, there were ten levels of obstacle courses for you to survive, and all while your opponents tried to do the same. And in rocket ball, you competed in what appeared to be a hybrid of more traditional sports such as polo and lacrosse, although the ball constantly changed textures, from being a wrecking ball, for example, to a Jell-O ball.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Rocket Science went out of business, and Rocket Jockey was only released on the PC.

Rollerball
Publisher: MGM Interactive

The Basics
Based on the ’75 sci-fi classic by the same name, Rollerball rolled all the strategy of today’s most popular team sports and the action of a demolition derby and kickboxing match into one. Set in 2098 (ten years after the events of the film), the game had you managing teams from around a world where wars are fought on the court instead of on the battlefield.

roller1 roller2 roller3 roller4

Goal points were amplified by how many times a team could successfully circle the court (grabbing hold of a team-controlled motorcycle helped) and score without giving up the ball at all. Once a goal was scored, two opposing team players had a few moments to beat the living hell out of each other for bonus points. Injuries and fatalities garnered huge bonuses. In fact, beating up on your opponents earned you as many points as dunking the ball.

roller5 roller6 roller7 roller8

From what we’d played of the game’s early stages, this title was unlike other futuristic sports games in that it was not dreadfully boring. It had moments of entertaining cartoon violence more along the lines of a wrestling event than, say, Virgin’s Thrill Kill.

roller9 roller10 roller11 roller12

WHAT HAPPENED?
Rollerball was being developed for MGM Interactive before the publisher layed off its employees and shut down operations. Rollerball was lost in the shuffle.

Shining Sword
Publisher: American Laser Games

The Basics
American Laser Games made their mark in the coin-op industry by cranking out laserdisc-driven full-motion video light-gun shooters with adult-video production values and wild overacting. Thing is, while their shooting games were (not really) worth a few bucks in quarters at the arcade, they were most definitely not worth forth or fifty bucks to earn–something ALG inexplicably failed to realize. The company also started up a very ill-fated Games For Girls division–I guess the same people who made their fortune appealing to the testosterone set arrogantly and foolishly thought they could hit upon the ever-elusive formula for producing games that women will actually play. Shining Sword was an action/adventure with plenty of one-on-one combat and what looked like a swank 3D engine, but it croaked as the result of ALG’s mismanaging themselves into the ground.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Unknown

ShredFest
Publisher: EA

The Basics
EA’s Shredfest was a snowplay version of Road Rash – in effect, a sequel wherein you did the same stuff in the snow and on snowboards as you did on the road on bikes. Minimal information was released, and some even reported seeing snowboarders in action, whacking up other snowboarders on the way down the slope. As far as we know, mocap sessions were completed using actual snowboarders.

shredfest1

WHAT HAPPENED?
EA released a snowboarding game for the PlayStation, but it wasn’t ShredFest or even distantly related. What happened to ShredFest? It hasn’t appeared yet, and it was supposed to come out in 1996.

 

Speed Tribes

Platform: PlayStation
Publisher: THQ

The Basics
Enter the bio-organic world based on Nemicron’s graphic novel, where the speed of your machine is the key to your survival. That was the sell phrase, but the game never came out. The developers used real-time 3D mixed with an element of strategy to begin creating Speed Tribes. The game would have delved into the violent domain of aerocycle riders. After joining up with one of the six tribes, you would have honed your skills so you could overcome all obstacles thrown your way. You’d also battle head-to-head in arena play or you’d have faced the enemy on its own turf – ultimately confronting the leader in the deadly blood run arena. Multiple gameplay options would have included one- and two-player, as well teamwork and combat modes. Your task was to be simple: survive.

WHAT HAPPENED?
The game was quietly canceled.

Star Wars: Episode 1 Racer
Publisher: LucasArts

The Basics
If you haven’t seen the successfully released Star Wars: Episode I Racer on the N64, the title takes a 15-minute segment of the film and turns it into a full-feature game. As its name suggests, Racer is an arcade racing game.
Based on the N64 version, the PlayStation game worked something like this: You enter the podrace, a tournament that is much like “the Ben Hur chariot race meets… Star Wars.” In Racer, each contestant drives a vehicle made of a small cockpit that’s literally dragged behind two or more huge starship engines. These vehicles speed upward of six hundred miles per hour and never go much higher than a few feet off the ground. When the LucasArts developers first read the film’s script, the podrace scene must have been the unanimous choice to adapt for the introductory game of the “new franchise,” and, of course, much has been added to the ten-minute scene. Instead of simply racing the course on the desert world of Tatooine, you have seven additional planets and more than 20 tracks to race, as well as more than 20 pilots besides young Anakin Skywalker to race as. The gameplay is much like other futuristic-style racing games out there (yes, I know it’s set in a time “long, long ago,” but bear with me), such as Psygnosis’ Wipeout XL and Nintendo’s F-Zero X, except that in this game there are no power-ups to acquire, and you can’t use offensive weapons against your opponents, at least until you unlock the main boss as a playable character. You compete in a series of tournaments made up of four or more races each. If you place fourth or better, you can continue to the next race and earn money to buy upgrades to your podracer, which you’ll need to hold your own against the increasingly tough AI opponents. The main feature that Racer offers over its competition is a feeling of speed beyond that of the few games that actually meet its 60-frames-per-second frame rate – on the N64. Would it have on the PlayStation? have what? That was LucasArts’ original goal.
Back to the released game. You’ll come upon obstacles such as boulders or large spacecraft so quickly that you’ll be gasping at your skill or luck when you manage to avoid them. But what makes the speed fun is its combination of a fantastic physics engine and great controls. You use the analog joystick to steer your ship, the A button acts as the gas, the B is the brake, the Z trigger creates a powerslide, and the right shoulder button deploys the repair droids to fix damage. Incidentally, this button slows you down when in use. Leaning completely forward on the joystick will build up a turbo boost, which is offset by the fact that leaning back and side-to-side will give you tighter turns. It’s a simple and elegant setup, really. Even with a few complaints lodged against it, Racer on the N64 was an incredibly fast, superfun game to play once you got a few levels into it. It’s better than F-Zero X, its closest competition on the N64, and it even approaches the PlayStation uberfuturistic racer, Wipeout XL. The game is even better than the scene from the movie that inspired it, and that’s a big compliment indeed.

WHAT HAPPENED?
A few short hours after posting our story that LucasArts’ Star Wars Episode 1: Racer was coming to the PlayStation, word of its cancellation showed up on an Internet message board. Apparently, LucasArts made it official at that point that the PlayStation version had indeed been halted.

LucasArts was tied to an agreement with Nintendo that prohibited the game from being released on any competing system for a specific number of months. It had been the company’s intention for quite some time to release the game on the PlayStation after its agreement with Nintendo ran out. LucasArts had hinted at the PlayStation version several times at E3, and in the months following the show. Work had indeed begun on the game.

Then came the following statement:

“While succeeding in both commercial and critical acclaim for the PC and N64 versions of Star Wars: Episode I Racer, LucasArts Entertainment Company will not proceed with the extension of the game for the Sony PlayStation platform. Instead, the company is refocusing its resources in anticipation of new Star Wars Episode I titles, both for current and emerging platforms.”

LucasArts reps decided that its manpower would be better used developing titles for next-generation platforms. At the time of cancellation, a spokesperson claimed that LucasArts had plans to develop titles for the PlayStation 2, the Nintendo GameCube, and the Sega Dreamcast.

StarCon
Publisher: Accolade

The Basics
Colony Wars: Vengeance almost had a bit of competition within the mission-based space-shooter genre with Accolade’s StarCon, a spinoff of the old Star Control series.

You played as either the Hyperium or the more sinister Crux, then – if you wished – you could go back and play as the other. Better yet, you could have played as one, and your friend could have been the other in a split-screen head-to-head competition. The head-to-head play was without a doubt the major feature that stood out in StarCon, and the feature that Psygnosis’ Colony Wars, itself an excellent-looking game, lacked. Cooperative play was also available.

The single-player mode was the mission mode. Missions were nonlinear, so you could choose the order in which you wanted to progress. Plus, after you finished the game, you could go back to missions you’d already played with your more powerful weapons and ships and uncover some secrets you couldn’t access in earlier levels.

Weapons included the particle beam laser turret, cannon turrets, and homing bolt targets, while fighter ships on your carrier (you had up to six) included the fast, maneuverable hawk and the powerful, heavier griffon. A third fighter, called the raven, would have been in place in time for the final product.
Two missions were in place in the early copy of the game we had received. In one mission, to keep the Crux from bombing your planet, you had to steal their bomb – then use it against them. The second required you to kill a Crux leader. Both were fun.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Accolade announced that StarCon had been put on hold for the time being. “The team will be spending the next few months reevaluating the design with the hopes of coming up with a stronger game,” a company spokesperson said. However, when we followed up with Accolade, no progress had been made, although a formal “This game is canceled” did not fall from the company’s lips.

Starfleet Academy
Publisher: Interplay

The Basics
Starfleet Academy never saw the light of day on the PlayStation, and frankly, we’re not really sure why Interplay decided to start publicizing Starfleet Academy nearly three years before its eventual release for the PC. But one thing’s for sure: When you start the hype machine that far in advance, the final product had better deliver all the goods as promised, and then some. Here’s a bit about the unfortunate PC game that managed to surface.

sim_stacad_screen01 sim_stacad_screen02 sim_stacad_screen03

In all fairness to the folks who worked on Starfleet Academy, part of the reason for the long incubation process was that the project was put on hold while the game’s producer worked on other titles. But that doesn’t change the fact that Starfleet Academy looks and plays no better than space combat games from two years ago – and when expectations are as high as they were for this game, that’s not gonna cut it.

sim_stacad_screen04 sim_stacad_screen05

Starfleet Academy put you in the Federation uniform of the sheepish David Forester, who just arrived at Starfleet Academy’s Command College in San Francisco. Forester was the commander of a group of cadets with a lot of potential – and a lot of emotional baggage. Two team members got into a squabble at the very first team meeting, and that was just the first of a series of problems involving each and every member of your crew. Added to this the appearance of a reactionary group at the Academy called the Vanguard, who believed all the Federation’s problems with the Klingons and Romulans could be solved through brutal retaliation – and the fact that one of your team members sympathized with this isolationist group – and you can see these aren’t going to be carefree school days.

In addition to keeping your cadets on track, you also met Star Trek luminaries such as Hikari Sulu, Pavel Chekhov, and of course the legendary James T. Kirk. All the scenes involving characters at the Academy were handled with full motion video, something of a letdown for those under the impression that the game gave you a chance to move about your quarters or throughout the Academy. And interaction was limited to selecting dialogue responses and then sitting back to see how well you chose.

WHAT HAPPENED?
The game is currently available for the PC and was originally expected for the PlayStation. Interplay sources say, however, that the PlayStation’s 2MB system memory capabilities fall short of what would be needed to make the title work.

Surreal
Publisher: ASC

The Basics
Surreal was to be a single-player action game with puzzle elements. You would’ve traveled through various periods attempting to solve riddles within real-time 3D graphic backgrounds, while attempting to defeat other characters.

surreal

WHAT HAPPENED?
Surreal just quietly disappeared from the PlayStation roster.

Ted Shred
Publisher: IBM

Ted Shred
The Basics
Riding on the cusp of “extreme” sport popularity, Ted Shred was yet another title that promised to be the “most radical” game ever and ended up face down in its own hyperbole. The game was essentially designed as a 3D side-scrolling action game including surfing, kayaking, skateboarding, jet skiing, and the likes. And since such sports wouldn’t be “extreme” without a cast of characters, the gamewould’ve featured those, too. Vulgaar was the arch villain and bad, bad landlord of the isle of Loki-Loco, and his clan was to be called the D.R.I.P. (Dirty Rotten Incompetent Punks). You would have battled from behind the persona of Ted Shred, the “coolest, most radical extreme surfer ever to shred the ocean blue.”

What did sound pretty cool was that Digital Domain, the special effects creators behind Apollo 13 and True Lies were animating this title. The game would’ve included eight levels of Crash Bandicoot-style gameplay.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Ted Shred quietly bit the dust.

Thrill Kill
Publisher: Virgin Interactive

The Basics
The Mortal Kombat series has been considered by most to be the bloodiest, goriest, most hard-core fighting game series of all. Virgin Interactive’s Thrill Kill, however, almost threatened to rip that reputation from Mortal Kombat as violently as its characters would have torn each other’s heads off. Literally.

psx_thrillki_screenshot01 psx_thrillki_screenshot02 psx_thrillki_screenshot03 psx_thrillki_screenshot04 psx_thrillki_screenshot05

Before we even start in on the exceptional level of violence, we played a lot of the demo, and it’s worth noting the best part of Thrill Kill was its multiplayer capability. You could have played a game against one, two, or three opponents at the same time (via the PlayStation multitap for three- and four-player games). That’s four people in a very small area all trying to kill each other. When you played your cards right, you got an unblockable attack – and you got to choose which of the other three to use it on – and when you used it, death was certain.

This unblockable attack was called the elimination kill, and the way it worked was pretty simple. The kill meter was your gauge for how much damage you inflicted on the other characters in the fight. Once this meter was full, you were energized by bolts of lighting from the sky (all Highlander style) and were given a limited period of time to corner an enemy. All the other characters cowered and slunk away since this was an unblockable attack, but you selected one, tracked him down, and then killed him in an unbelievable and obscene way. Examples include Oddball’s method of jumping up onto your shoulders and wrenching off your head and Belladonna’s oh-so-special way with a cattle prod (she stabbed you with it and electrocuted you – at which point you exploded). More on them later. Players on the scampering side soon learned to kick and hit other opponents toward the player looking for blood. Since the kill meter only filled when you struck someone, Thrill Kill effectively rewarded the most aggressive players, and players used to turtling in other games will definitely lose out.
Controls were very basic: two punch buttons and two kick buttons. You moved freely through the 3D environment with the D-pad. Each character had several grappling moves; for some you simply press a punch and kick button simultaneously, others required a move or two on the D-pad first. One of the most outrageous was Belladonna’s “mount.” She jumped on the back of her opponent, forcing him on his hands and knees, and then she slapped him across the buttocks with her cattle prod. (Did we mention that Thrill Kill unabashedly throws in moments of in-your-face sadomasochism in addition to all the spurting blood and gore?)
The game would have had eleven characters, including three boss characters who wouldn’t have been playable until they were beaten. Some of the characters included Dr. Faustus, a madman with a bear trap for a mouth and a very sharp scalpel; Imp, a midget who walked on very sharp stilts and knew what other uses sharp sticks can be put to; and Mammoth, a very, very big guy who happened to be the “pure embodiment of primal rage and fury.” Each one of the characters had four unique alternate outfits. Belladonna, for instance, had a naughty nurse’s outfit, a little black number with stilettos and stockings, a French maid’s uniform, and another one that isn’t nearly as… sexy as the first three.

From what we saw, the game was graphically very impressive. The incredibly detailed 3D polygon characters were composed of 650 polygons each, giving them all incredible definition. All of the characters moved, kicked, and punched extremely fluidly. The levels were all textured and featured amazing lighting effects. (The blood-smearing effect on the floor and walls was also pretty cool.)

Yep, blood spilled freely in Thrill Kill (like when you played a team game and you grabbed one of the opponent’s arms and held them so your buddy could freely whale away on him), but it was all in good fun. The whole game had a very B-movie feeling, an almost campy “Army of Darkness meets Texas Chainsaw Massacre” air about it. So people shouldn’t have taken it so seriously. But they did, somehow.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Thrill Kill was a complete game when the title was axed. An EA spokesperson told videogames.com that the title was “shelved because its content was not appropriate for the market.” When the announcement was made, gobs of hungry gamers screamed and yelled and e-mailed and petitioned, but their efforts got them nowhere as EA said it wouldn’t shop the title to another publisher.

After repeated inquiries from readers, we contacted Electronic Arts to reconfirm the status of Thrill Kill. The company reiterated that the PlayStation title has been canceled and will not be published. When asked if the title would be sold to another publisher, EA responded that Thrill Kill would not. That’s it folks – Thrill Kill RIP.

However, Westwood, the original holders of the Thrill Kill license, still owns the engine and the technology in the game (which is actually quite innovative) and may release a game in the future using that engine, although no news is available yet.

 

Viper Red Sector
Publisher: New World Comp

The Basics
What is this all about? Yet another creation of mankind goes bad and turns against its creators in Viper: Red Sector, a game of flight simulation and aerial combat. You would’ve played the role of the only fighter pilot on earth whose brainwaves could control a squadron of robot fighter planes, which were designed to eliminate a race of irate synthetic humanoids. You would’ve guided these planes, one at a time, against the enemy in six campaigns and more than 40 sorties. Your planes wouldn’t have flown on rails: You would have swooped your fighter anywhere you wanted through the game’s texture-mapped environments. Advanced AI, too.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Viper Red Sector was canceled without explanation shortly after 3DO purchased New World.

Virtual Gallup
Publisher: Sunsoft

The Basics
Virtual Gallup was to be a realistic 3D-rendered horse racing game in which you controlled the horses as the jockey. Racing well would’ve won you points to use to upgrade your horse’s speed, stamina, dash, and gait, which would’ve increased your horse’s chances of being victorious in the next race. The developers planned to store racing statistics in the game’s database, which was designed to keep track of the past three years of racing.

WHAT HAPPENED?
Virtual Gallup disappeared for no apparent reason.

WCW/NWO Live
Publisher: THQ

The Basics
In a mad dash to make the most out of its expiring WCW license (Electronic Arts took over in 1999), THQ tried to prep WCW/NWO Live for release at the end of 1998. Since it was coming from Tomy, we surmised it contained at least some part of the Toukon Retsuden 3 engine.  More than 30 wrestlers were present in the game, but only half of them were from the WCW or NWO. The rest of the roster was filled with Japanese wrestlers. You could create your own wrestler, specifying height, weight, clothes, hair, moves, rants, and tattoos.

psx_wcwnwol_screenshot01 psx_wcwnwol_screenshot02 psx_wcwnwol_screenshot03

The game reportedly ran at 60 frames per second at one point, even in the four-player mode. The game was to contain signature finishing moves and real entrance music, giving the game a realistic (well, as realistic as you can get in a wrestling game) look and feel.

WHAT HAPPENED?
THQ’s WWF Smackdown! for the PlayStation used a variation of the Toukon 3 engine originally intended for the deceased WCW/NWO Live.

Werewolf: The Apocalypse
Publisher: Capcom

The Basics
Werewolf: The Apocalypse was an action-adventure game that would have brought to life the White Wolf role-playing game known as the Storyteller series. In single- or two-player mode, you would have navigated through six worlds as one of seven Garou characters, each maintaining the forms of human, wolf, and werewolf simultaneously. Each character’s abilities directly reflected that character’s abilities in the Storyteller game. This was planned as a 3D game, seen through a three-quarter perspective with roaming cameras and multiple paths.

were2 were3 were4 were5

WHAT HAPPENED?
Capcom stated that the game tried to be too much of everything, combining too many genre elements that didn’t work well together.

Wetlands
Publisher: New World Comp

The Basics
Wetlands was to be a single-player futuristic adventure game packed with action and mystery. You would have taken on the role of a tracker who had been hired by a distant planet’s authorities to recapture a dangerous escaped prisoner. The prisoner was to have left only one clue behind, a note reading, “Wetlands. April 6.” As the tracker, you would have had to journey to the water-covered planet Wetlands and track down the prisoner before the April 6 deadline. Your pursuit would’ve taken you above and below water and through various underwater facilities, all the while fending off thugs and solving mysteries. The game’s graphics were originally created using roto-scoped cel animation techniques.

wetlands

WHAT HAPPENED?
Wetlands was canceled without explanation shortly after 3DO purchased New World.

1 2 3

4 Comments

Leave A Reply
  1. November 19, 2013, 12:07 am

    […] Video Game Graveyard […]

    Reply
  2. Charles says
    April 3, 2014, 4:35 am

    Man a lot of these games would have been great to own, but such is history. Plus why did Psygnosis cancel a lot of games for the PS1? I love their games and they don’t have too many on the PS1 🙁

    Reply
  3. Leonardo Culver says
    June 8, 2014, 9:54 pm

    Damn,that sucks.I would’ve loved to play Beavis & Butthead Do Hollywood.It looked like so much fun.

    Reply
  4. Profile photo of Wesley Campbell
    April 14, 2016, 2:59 pm

    Beavis and Butthead Do Hollywood should exist. 🙁

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Skip to toolbar